Adahn

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About Adahn

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  • Birthday 12/25/1993

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  1. I played most of that game, but for some reason I only remember him as "Dreamfart". I've got to go shopping now, but I'll edit the post later if I can think of something.
  2. Drizzt: One of the main benefits of GM crops is that in many cases, it's possible to completely eliminate the use of pesticides. I think nearly all the corn in the U.S. is already and has been genetically modified for a long time. To prove your point, there was a massive overproduction of corn recently, of which you are likely aware. Environmental factors still play an enormous part, though, so yearly crop yields vary. As for the fuel, genetic modifications can eliminate the need for pesticides, which I believe plays an important part in the fuel requirements for food production. Everyone's afraid of being the first generation to experience the possible side effects of GM crops. It's already too late, though, as almost all the corn in the U.S. is already genetically modified. I guess it will be our generation that points to corn to say whether or not it was a bad idea! The13thMan: Cloning crops is the worst idea ever. The irish potato famine was a result of cutting seed potatoes from the same crop and replanting them, essentially using cloned potatoes for years. The cloned potatoes were susceptible to a disease, and since there was no genetic variation, all the potatoes died and lots of people starved to death. Just to play both sides of the GM crops issue, scientists were able to express a protein from brazil nuts in soybeans, and people that at the genetically modified soybeans that were allergic to brazil nuts had an allergic reaction to the soybeans. However, this is an extreme case where the allergen from another plant was identified and expressed purposefully in another food crop. Most genetic modifications either remove a gene from a plant or add a gene (proven not to be an allergen) that was taken from another plant. An example is golden rice. Rice is missing one protein that allows it to produce an essential vitamin (I think vitamin A). This causes all the rice to produce vitamin A, and the rice can be grown/distributed cheaply to populations that have been shown to have a vitamin A deficiency in their diet. Due to resistance from people wary of GM crops, golden rice is not used very widely and many people who could benefit from it will die from poor nutrition. There once were Flavr Savr tomatoes. They were genetically modified, but no gene was added to them. Tomatoes and other crops need to decompose in order for their seeds to spread efficiently. They do this in large part by producing ethylene, which triggers the decomposition of the fruit/vegetable. When the gene that produces ethylene is removed, the plants do not rot on the vine. It increased shelf life and productivity with no risk of any foreign protein causing allergic reactions. They were available temporarily, but due to a public outcry they were banned and no longer are available.
  3. Hey Everybody! I'm curious to know what your thoughts and opinions are on genetically modified organisms. I've also just finished working in a lab that used mouse as a model organism, so if any of you have any questions or thoughts on the use of animals in research, I may be able to tell you something interesting. Since most concerns with GMO's are about food crops, it might also be interesting to talk about the development of organic foods. My opinion on GM crops is that if implemented correctly, they could greatly increase productivity and lower costs to consumers and farmers. I think there is a knowledge barrier between laymen and scientists that is preventing us from using genetic modification to its full potential. I understand countries other than the U.S. realize the benefits and are switching over to GM crops, so anyone from a different country could give especially valuable input that my own background cannot provide. I think everyone but the most adamant animal rights activists acknowledge the benefits that come from animal research. However, it is possible that anyone here who is against using animals for research may be misinformed in some areas, and I may be able to shed some light on the subject. Lastly, I see organic foods as the opposite of GM foods. They require more resources to produce and cost more to consumers and farmers. My wife loves organic foods, and while I try to dissuade her from getting everything organic because of the price, I don't mind if she buys organic eggs and milk. She says they taste different, but they all taste the same to me. I think the 'organic movement' is more based on making consumers feel like they're eating wholesome, 'natural' foods rather than on health benefits. Since I don't look for reasons to spend extra money on food, I may be missing some vital research on the subject, and if anyone here is an organic guru it would be nice to hear some reasons why organic foods are worth the price. That's all I can crank out at 4am, so I hope to hear from some of you tomorrow!
  4. [size=2][/size] [size=2]Depending on the circumstances, sex can be wonderful or terrible or anything inbetween. Your first time is an experience, and it can affect sex for the rest of your life.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, what's wrong with being a virgin? There are pressures all around you, and if you somehow find yourself a virgin in your mid 20's or later, there may be shame associated with your situation. At that age, it is generally expected that one has had some experience with sex. This may make it difficult for one to develop a romantic relationship with another person. In turn, this could lead to a traumatic first sexual encounter, especially if it's with someone who degrades you for poor performance. You won't be a virgin anymore, but you will be even less prepared for a healthy sexual relationship.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]This doesn't mean old virgins are doomed, though. They may find someone caring and supportive to give them a useful, enjoyable experience that leads to a healthy sex life.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]I'll give you something to ponder. If you are a virgin, you are most likely very bad at sex. No one is born a porn star, and you can pretty much expect to be terrible in bed your first time.[/size]
  5. [size=2]I thought it was a good question. You'd rather suffer horrible losses and excruciating pain than be a despicably evil person.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]As for yours, I'd most fear being burnt alive. I imagine I'd go unconscious after a good time of drowning and being hit with rocks, so that would make the end nicer. Being burned alive would hurt until the very moment I expired.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, you didn't like my choices? I'll try to make my choices a little softer :)[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]1. Hugging a cute, fluffy white kitten?[/size] [size=2]2. Rubbing noses with a sweet, gentle bunny rabbit?[/size] [size=2]3. Petting a puppy that's only a couple weeks old?[/size]
  6. [size=2]I'd have to choose being blinded as my greatest fear of all three. Neither of the other choices would really disable me.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, whoever is next, which of these would you fear the most?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]1. Permanently forgetting everything about anyone you've ever met, and everything you've ever done, without any hope of recovering your memory.[/size] [size=2]2. Realizing that you have an overwhelming urge to rape and murder young children.[/size] [size=2]3. Being tortured painfully and continuously for one year, after which you would emerge without any physical deformities, and with your mind intact, but never being able to forget what you suffered.[/size]
  7. [font=Tahoma]So, what scares me as a male? Well, I'm not afraid of too many things, and the things that do scare me don't have much to do with me being a guy. However, I can easily contort my fears to conform with your question. I am afraid of pointy things. Needles are a good example, but I'm also cautious around tacks, knives, and anything else that can put a hole in me, like guns. [b]Masculine contortion:[/b] I am afraid of being penetrated, as this goes against my natural male role as a penetrator. I am ridiculously afraid of spiders. I can be pretty tough if I've got a weapon and the little guy cornered, but if one gets on me, I will freak the hell out. You'd think Death himself had laid his hand on me. [b]Masculine contortion:[/b] I'm afraid of spiders because I think my junk will fall off if one bites me. I am afraid of others noticing my mistakes. It's ok if I make one and nobody knows about it, but if someone finds out, I'll do anything possible to deny it. I don't let others know that I know I'm wrong. [b]Masculine contortion:[/b] Guys never admit that they are wrong, or that they need directions. We don't need your help, and we don't need your bitching. I am incapable of peeing in the same room as someone I don't know. I also can't pee in a urinal, unless I know that the entire building is empty and there is zero chance of someone walking in on me. [b]Masculine contortion:[/b] I'm afraid that if anyone is in the same room [spoiler]with my impressive physical endowments,[/spoiler] they will be overcome with a jealous, murderous rage, and not even [spoiler]my mighty club[/spoiler] will be enough to fight them off. (not really, but it was fun to type anywho) As for fears in relation to women, I have none. Women are all as harmless as kittens :catgirl:
  8. [font=Tahoma][size=2]I have to live at home right now, too, and it really does suck to be treated like I'm still a kid. I spent a year on campus, though, and was able to develop my own individuality.[/size][/font] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, there are a couple things your friend can do.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]First, she can work very hard to get scholarships. If she can get enough financial aid through loans and scholarships to live on campus, then she can go live on campus. Even if it's for just a year, it should give her enough of an experience to go back home with some experience with independence, which could allow her to stand up to her parents in such a way that they'll still want her around. So long as she lives at home, though, she's going to have to tolerate being treated like a child.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Secondly, she can get a full time job over the summer, and save all of her money so that she can live on campus the next year. It will be hard, but if she wants independence, she's going to have to sacrifice her time for it.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]There is no easy way to get out of your parents' house, especially if you go to college and don't have very much money. If she really works at it, I think she'll be able to succeed.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]On a side note, I can't WAIT to be out and living on my own. Hopefully by this fall, I'll live with my wife (not married yet, but will be soon enough!) on campus, and never have to rely on my parents for a roof over my head again.[/size]
  9. [size=2]How do you think your life would be different if you were the opposite gender?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Now, to uncomplicate things, don't go rewriting your past. Take your current situation, and assume that you are the opposite gender. There wasn't some strange transformation that you are aware of. You must pretend that you have always been the opposite gender, yet still ended up in your current situation.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]First of all, I would probably have to get up an hour earlier than normal, because I would actually have to spend time getting ready to go to my classes. I would have to make my hair look nice, and probably put on make-up. I would also have to start exercising regularly, because it would be less acceptable for me to weigh as much as I do. I'd probably have to shave my legs and armpits, and pluck my eyebrows. At college, my routine probably wouldn't change too much.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Ech, this is ridiculously difficult! I honestly have [i]no[/i] idea what it would be like to be a girl. Instead of calling this a failed experiment and opting not to post the thread, however, I'll diverge from what I originally intended.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]What is it like being a girl? I'll try to set up a background for comparison by saying what it's like (for me) to be a guy.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Other guys,[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Go ahead and talk about what it's like being a guy for yourself.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Ok, so I wake up in the morning, and if I don't smell or look bad, I don't think I need a shower. I may or may not shave my face, depending on whether I remember. I don't do anything with my hair, because I simply don't care. I don't exercise beyond my daily routine of walking to and from classes, but I will if my girl tells me to. I wear the same pants for days at a time, because it's hard to tell jeans apart. It's cold, so I'll wear the same shirt if I can wear a coat over it. I don't need to actively look for girls, but many of them dress in a way that catches my eye. I'm never afraid to speak up about something, and I am never demure. If I itch somewhere, I scratch. I burp and fart, but try not to do so around people. If I do, I don't get too embarassed. I don't socialize very much.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, why do I think these things are significant? I think girls (in general) care much more about their appearance than I do. This is evident by how all the girls around me look...prepared. There are also only two types of girls. Those who don't control their weight, and those who do. There are no intermediates that I can see. I just assume girls change clothes regularly, because they're more used to being noticed. I don't meet many girls with a forceful personality, they mostly exude some amount of deference. Girls seem to control their body movements more precisely, more fluidly, and are not apt to contort their bodies to reach some pesky itch. Most girls seem kind of chatty, at least they talk more than I do, and usually when I talk to one of them, they initiate and guide the conversation.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Well, that's all I've got for now. This thread can also be used to discuss anything related to gender, but I thought it would be nice to set up a base for discussion, just in case nobody else comes up with something.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Also, if I'm horribly wrong in any or all of my assumptions, please do tell me. I love to learn new things, especially when they deal with human nature.[/size]
  10. [QUOTE=taperson] First of all, have you yourself ever struggled with a self image/esteem problem? In other words, have you ever seen yourself as too fat/ugly/etc until it got to the point that you obsessed over it? Have you ever known someone go through this? Feel free to share stories.[/QUOTE] I was horribly teased and ignored by just about everyone I went to school with at a very young age. As a result, I saw myself as someone who could never be attractive to anyone. It wasn't really an obsession, but it did affect me. When girls did show an interest in me, I ignored them completely. I never really understood that it was possible for someone to like me, even through the end of high school. [QUOTE=taperson] Second of all, do you have any advice for overcoming it? Did you tell your parents [and if you did, HOW]? What steps did you take to overcome this?[/QUOTE] My advice to you is to find someone you trust and love to tell you that you're beautiful. There's someone out there who will be so blinded by your personality and appearance that all your 'flaws' will be invisible to them. I never talked to my parents about it. I didn't really take any conscious steps towards the solution, but I found it nonetheless. I met my fiancee on the internet, talked to her, exchanged pictures, fell in love, then met in person. She loves me for who I am, so I don't really care about my appearance anymore. Also, she's always beautiful to me, and I tell her so every day. [QUOTE=taperson] Just a note, having a low self image is a SELF thing. It has nothing to do with how people see you but with how you see yourself.[/QUOTE] When you objectify and judge yourself, it's not very much a self thing anymore. You see yourself as an other, one who you can change, and you want to control this other person's appearance. If you recognize that the girl in the mirror isn't someone you should push around, you may learn to let yourself [i]be[/i] yourself, which could help with your problem. It will lead to a pretty laid back lifestyle, but that's not such a bad thing, is it?
  11. [font=Tahoma]Allamorph, I'm extremely uninformed in the area of physiology, so if you would be so kind as to tell me what the hell a pituitary gland is, and what function it has, I would be more than happy to answer your question. Mnemonica, I thought this particular mistake of mine was dead and buried, but here I find it resurrected. *sigh* I was bored when I created this thread, and wrote the introductory post to amuse myself. I am quite capable of discussing topics of substance and depth, but lately nothing has come to mind. When I combine pretty words with deep thoughts, the effect can be quite pleasant. Either without the other is quite ineffective and unappealing. I hope you enjoy OtakuBoards, and I hope you can find an RP that suits you. [/font]
  12. [size=2]Oh, I love nothing more than taking a shot in the dark.[/size] [size=2]DS, you were talking to your friends about whoever died, and that the person's death itself didn't really bother you, because you didn't know them. They got on your case about it, saying you were heartless. You didn't feel as if you'd done something wrong, so you defended your position to the point that what you were talking about was twisted.[/size] [size=2]You are not wrong in feeling little for the person who died, and you are right in feeling bad for your friend.[/size] [size=2]Whether this happened recently or not, it is not appropriate to discuss these sentiments with your friends.[/size] [size=2]In bringing this up, you have made a mistake, not a heartless one, but a stupid one. Own up to it and apologize for speaking inappropriately. This will allow you to stop defending your position, however right it may be, and start smoothing over the ruffles you've created with your (either thoughtless or too thoughtful) comments.[/size] [size=2]I, personally, hate the thought that I have done something wrong, and have a huge difficulty admitting my mistakes. It's a character flaw I have, and one that you may share with me. I defend myself when I should apologize, even if I feel in the core of my being that I am absolutely correct. It's the hardest thing to do, and usually the best thing one can do in a situation like this.[/size]
  13. [font=Tahoma]Well, I met my fiance' on the internet. On OtakuBoards, in fact. It's easy enough to verify someone's identity. A webcam, an internet connection, and a messenger program like AIM or yahoo make the identity of the person you're communicating with undeniable.[/font]
  14. [font=Tahoma][size=2]Well, the whole thing about laughing at any reason for prohibiting stem cell research stems (haha) mainly from my aggravation with how little people understand about the subject.[/size][/font] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Even if someone does do something wonderful, like changing stem cell research so that it alleviates moral issues, politicians and the public take a distrusting stance, ask for more research, and all the while people are suffering and dying from disabilities that could possibly be cured/prevented by this research. I have very little patience when it comes to things of this nature.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]I hate politics, and I think politicians hate science :D [/size]
  15. [size=2]Swordsaint,[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]I'll do my best to give an explanation suitable for those who aren't hardcore science majors.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]First of all, fetal stem cells are a thing of the past, and no longer very relevant. They [i]are [/i]able to develop into any kind of human tissue, but stem cells taken from fetuses are not genetically identical to the patient they would be used to cure. Research [i]can [/i]be done on them to see how stem cells function, but this is largely seen as morally wrong, because they are taken from aborted fetuses.[/size] [size=2][/size] [u][size=2]It is no longer necessary to use fetuses for stem cell research.[/size][/u] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, what [i]can [/i]we do to obtain stem cells?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Every cell in your body has a nucleus, and every nucleus contains the same DNA (except for eggs and sperm). Now, your cells have specific functions, but imagine for a moment that one of your skin cells is a newly formed zygote (a fertilized egg). When that cell divides, it has many genes that allow it to go through the incredibly complex process of turning into a fully-developed human being. We can alter that DNA, so that the 'zygote' cannot develop into a human being, because it lacks the genes that coordinate where all your limbs and organs go. Because of this, the 'zygote' cannot develop past a cluster of cells.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]Now, each and every one of your cells isn't actually a zygote, but you've got to treat it as one to understand what happens next.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]You take the DNA from one of your own cells, which is the same as any other cell in your body, and you put it into an egg that has had its own DNA removed. The egg's DNA has no potential to be a human being, because it only has half as many genes as a human being. Removing this DNA is no different from a woman discharging an egg cell during her period.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, what has been done so far?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]We've altered the DNA in a single human cell. There shouldn't be anything morally wrong with this, because X-rays and UV-radiation from the sun alter human DNA, also. We are doing nothing that does not occur naturally, just doing it more precisely to achieve a desired effect.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]We've also removed the DNA from an unfertilized egg. This DNA has [u]no potential[/u] to become a human being. No life is lost. If you think one removing one egg cell's DNA has anything to do with killing a human being, then every time a man attempts to impregnate a woman, billions of human beings die (lots and lots of sperm will not survive to fertilize an egg). It just doesn't make sense to humanize eggs or sperm.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, what's next?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]We insert the DNA from one of your cells into the egg cell. This cell is now genetically identical to any one of your cells. The egg cell has no DNA of its own (except for mitochondrial DNA, but that's not important here). This cell can now grow and divide, and every cell is a stem cell. Also, if the person who donated the DNA is sick, these stem cells are genetically identical to that person, so there is no chance of tissue rejection or other related complications.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, what haven't we done?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]1. We have not 'cloned' someone. The cell we have made cannot turn into a human being. It is just a clump of stem cells that will die if they are implanted into a uterus.[/size] [size=2]2. We have not fertilized an egg, making a new human being. Fertilization requires an egg and sperm to fuse, making a unique and new person. Many people believe that the fusion of egg and sperm is where life begins.[/size] [size=2]3. We have not violated anything human. Egg and sperm cells die by the trillions upon trillions every day. Removing DNA from an unfertilized egg harms nothing and noone in any way. Removing DNA from someone's cells and modifying it is also nothing new. DNA testing [i]requires[/i] this, and instead of modifying it like we do, they must destroy it.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]So, why is stem cell research an issue?[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]1. People still think stem cell research deals with aborted fetuses.[/size] [size=2]2. Almost nobody really knows what's going on in the scientific world.[/size] [size=2]3. People don't trust what scientists say.[/size] [size=2]4. Stem cell research has been made a political issue, and politicians who argue for [u]and[/u] against it don't know what the hell they're talking about.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]I don't know about you, but it sort of pisses me off. There is so much benefit that can be gained from this research, but it's not happening because politicians are pretty much retarded when it comes to science.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2]If anyone here can still come up with a reason to oppose stem cell research, I would really like to hear it. I can always use a good laugh. Hell, maybe someone will surprise me and come up with a real reason why we're letting thousands of people suffer for the sake of some obscure, minor, moral dilemma.[/size] [size=2][/size] [size=2][/size]