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Derald

Entomology: Care to look?

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To be completely honest with you, the first thing I thought of when I saw this thread was Gil Grissom from CSI. :animeswea
Personally, I'm not a fan of bugs. I really hate bugs. [I]Especially[/I] spiders. Where I'm from we get black widows, and I swear I'm definately not going to be able to sleep tonite!
Soooo to make me not so wussy compared to you entomology buffs, I decided to contribute my own kinda bug.
[IMG]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/0e/Ladybug_on_a_leaf.jpg/250px-Ladybug_on_a_leaf.jpg[/IMG]
That's right the Ladybug!
[B]Scientific classification [/B]
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Coleoptera
Suborder: Polyphaga
Infraorder: Cucujiformia
Superfamily: Cucujoidea
Family: Coccinellidae
Latreille, 1807

Other interesting facts:
Ladybirds are found worldwide, with over 4,500 species described, more than 450 native to North America alone.

Ladybirds are small insects, ranging from 1 mm to 10 mm (0.04 to 0.4 inches), and are usually yellow, orange, or red with small black spots on their carapace, with black legs, head and feelers.

This next one has a little parental discretion...
[SPOILER]The ladybird beetle copulates for up to nine hours at a time, and males may have three 90-minute orgasms in one session[/SPOILER] :animeblus

Ladybirds are beneficial to organic gardeners because most species are insectivores, consuming aphids, fruit flies, thrips, and other tiny plant-sucking insects that damage crops

Thank God for Wikipedia!

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[quote name='KatanaViolet']This next one has a little parental discretion...[/quote]
[FONT=Times New Roman][COLOR=DarkSlateGray] :animeblus My question is, who's the guy who finds these things OUT? And HOW did he find it out?[/FONT][/COLOR]

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My post won't follow the same format as most of the rest of the thread, since I just wanted to say that I thought this [url=http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/03/0308_060308_spider.html][u] short article[/u][/url] was quite interesting. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the spider's body structure--even with the labeled photograph included, it doesn't totally make sense to me. Pretty interesting stuff, though.

~Dagger~

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[QUOTE=Dagger]My post won't follow the same format as most of the rest of the thread, since I just wanted to say that I thought this [url=http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/03/0308_060308_spider.html][u] short article[/u][/url] was quite interesting. I'm still trying to wrap my mind around the spider's body structure--even with the labeled photograph included, it doesn't totally make sense to me. Pretty interesting stuff, though.

~Dagger~[/QUOTE][color=#4B0082]o_O It looks like it has the abdomen of a spider, the thorax of a praying mantis, and the legs of a grasshopper. . . . The platypus of the arthropods?

And I'll also vouch for dragonflies biting when handled. They don't care if they're just sitting on you, but hold one in place and you'll find that sucker chomping down on your finger. Not that it hurts much--at least not from the common Darner dragonflies. Now, when I caught an alligator lizard and it latched onto my finger, that hurt. . . . But that's a different subject.[/color]

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[FONT=Trebuchet MS][SIZE=1][COLOR=Sienna]Ah, I have finally returned to my faithful thread, and I must say that I'm impressed with how it's doing. To be honest, I never really thought this thread would take off, seeing as I was just another newbie back when this was made.

Well, I'll search for something to add and edit it in later.

P.S. - [B]Dagger[/B], that was quite the specimen you found. Kudos to you on my behalf.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

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[SIZE="1"][FONT="Arial"]The time has come, once again, for sakurasuka to reenter this thread with the next creepy-crawly-many-legged installment. Meet the Red Roman Spider*.

Solifugid-
[img]http://www.museums.org.za/bio/images/scorpions/sol1.jpg[/img]

Ranging from 15-70mm (160mm including legs), these terrifying creatures aren't really very harmful to humans. Their venom is not deadly, but they have powerful jaws. They are carnivorous creatures who feed on anything from bugs to rats and small birds.

One thing that is particularly unpleasant is that solifugae prefer hair for nesting, so it is not uncommon for them to approach sleeping humans and dogs and collect hair. They are common mostly the Africa.



*Technically, the Red Roman, or solifugae, is not a spider in the least. It is closely related, however. They also go by the name of Sun Spiders, though they, ironically, flee from sunlight and prefer dark spaces. Most Red Romans are nocturnal.[/FONT][/SIZE]

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[url=http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html]http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html[/url].
[COLOR=DarkOrange][FONT=Century Gothic]
The goliath tarantula is arguably the biggest spider in the world. This thing can eat small mammals! It's known for taking down birds! o_0 To me, this is the most bad *** of all insects. I mean... dang! Watch the video, you'll see what i'm talkin' about.

This picture makes my skin crawl....[/FONT][/COLOR]

[IMG]http://www.kingsnake.com/suncoastherpsociety/images/tarantula1.jpg[/IMG]

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[color=#4B0082]Your link is broken, The13thMan. It should be pointing to [url=http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html]http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html[/url].

Speaking of arthropods eating small rodents and birds, I found this [url=http://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/site/backyardbirds/hummingbirds/mantis-hummer.aspx][u]article[/u][/url] about a praying mantis eating a hummingbird. It's got pics, too:

[center][img]http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/8349/mantiscatcheshummingbirmi4.jpg[/img][/center]
I'm torn between feeling sorry for the hummingbird and cheering on the mantis. I think it's pretty awesome that the mantis could catch something that big.[/color]

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[quote name='Desbreko'][color=#4B0082]Your link is broken, The13thMan. It should be pointing to [url=http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html]http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2006/10/061027-tarantula-video.html[/url].

Speaking of arthropods eating small rodents and birds, I found this [url=http://www.birdwatchersdigest.com/site/backyardbirds/hummingbirds/mantis-hummer.aspx][u]article[/u][/url] about a praying mantis eating a hummingbird. It's got pics, too:

[center][img]http://img235.imageshack.us/img235/8349/mantiscatcheshummingbirmi4.jpg[/img][/center]
I'm torn between feeling sorry for the hummingbird and cheering on the mantis. I think it's pretty awesome that the mantis could catch something that big.[/color][/QUOTE]

[COLOR=DarkOrange][FONT=Century Gothic]Dad-gurn-et! Well, thank ya very much for alerting me of the problem... and ousting me in my own game!

That mantis is pretty incredible. I actually recalled a picture of a goliath tarantula taking down a bird but couldn't ever find it on the web. Haha, get it? Anyways, that's just awesome.


[/FONT][/COLOR]

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[FONT="Lucida Console"][SIZE="1"][COLOR="RoyalBlue"]I'm back. Anyone miss me?

Anyhow, on to my post:

[URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant_Weta"]Deinacrida heteracantha[/URL]:
[IMG]http://www.geocities.co.jp/NatureLand-Sky/8651/photo/giant_weta.jpg[/IMG]

Since we seem to be more inclined towards bigger creatures today, I give you the Giant Weta of New Zealand.

This particular species is native to New Zealand's Little Barrier Island, and it is amongst the largest giant weta species in the world; in fact, it's arguably the heaviest insect in the world.

I wish to hold one - perhaps even have one as a pet.

P.S. - The13thMan, a tarantula is an arachnid. I just thought I should clear that up.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

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[quote name='Derald'][FONT="Lucida Console"][SIZE="1"][COLOR="Teal"]
P.S. - The13thMan, a tarantula is an arachnid. I just thought I should clear that up.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT][/QUOTE]

[COLOR=DarkOrange][FONT=Century Gothic]I didn't realize there was any confusion that needed to be cleared up.

You did say you wanted some arthropods, didn't you?

I don't know a lot about bugs/insects/spiders and whatnot, so please do educate me.
[/FONT][/COLOR]

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[quote name='The13thMan'][COLOR=DarkOrange][FONT=Century Gothic]I didn't realize there was any confusion that needed to be cleared up.

You did say you wanted some arthropods, didn't you?

I don't know a lot about bugs/insects/spiders and whatnot, so please do educate me.
[/FONT][/COLOR][/QUOTE]

[FONT="Lucida Console"][SIZE="1"][COLOR="RoyalBlue"]This is why I created this thread in the first place; I'll be happy to clear up any confusion to the best of my abilities.

I just need more people to get involved.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

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[quote name='The13thMan'][COLOR=DarkOrange][FONT=Century Gothic]I didn't realize there was any confusion that needed to be cleared up.

You did say you wanted some arthropods, didn't you?

I don't know a lot about bugs/insects/spiders and whatnot, so please do educate me.
[/FONT][/COLOR][/QUOTE]


[FONT="Arial"][SIZE="1"]I think he was referring to when you called the goliath tarantula the most badass [i]insect[/i], when it is most certainly an arachnid. Not to say arachnids aren't welcome in an entomology thread, but calling a spider an insect is like calling a hummingbird a beetle. Though it is very likely that you just mis-typed and there really [i]is[/i] nothing that needs clearing up.

General rule of thumb:
Six legs= Insect.
Eight legs= Arachnid.

Not always true, but for the most part.



Edit: I would also like to add another critter. Rather than the largest, I'm going to talk about one of the tiniest most common creatures that most people see on a regular basis without even knowing it.

Dust Mites.
[img]http://www.camden.rutgers.edu/~bwhitlow/AMULET/webpagestuff/dads_dust_mite.jpg[/img]

These little critters are the cause of most allergens. They are also quite common. Dust mites are small, but it is possible to see them on a black surface with a magnifying glass. They feed on dust particles, mainly dead skin. They are disgusting and live from 30 days to 10 weeks, and can lay 500 eggs in a five week period.

They are also very resilient, bleach and other houshold cleaners can't kill them. The best you can do is keep your house as dust-free as possible.

[/SIZE][/FONT]

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[FONT="Lucida Console"][SIZE="1"][COLOR="RoyalBlue"]Wha-? Where have I been these past couple of years? All I recall is graduating from High School, registering at the community college, getting a job at SAM'S Club, and...wait, why am I here?

Oh, I remember now!

[I][COLOR="Black"]Graphidostreptus gigas:[/COLOR][/I]
[IMG]http://www.dinosoria.com/insectes/mille-patte-geant.jpg[/IMG]

Commonly known as the African Black Millipede, or even simply the Giant Millipede, this specimen is one of the two largest living millipedes, growing up to around 28 centimeters in length, and it can live up to 6 years.

Millipedes, in general, have 2 pairs of legs per body segment, excluding the first, and vary in sizes from a few millimeters, to what was just mentioned in my previous paragraph. They come in 4 main categories: Cylindrical, Plated, Pill, and Bristly.

Graphidostreptus gigas is categorized as a Cylindrical millipede due to its blunt, bulldozing head and cylindrical body. Cylindrical millipedes are most noted for bulldozing their way through soil and leaf litter in order to reach their main food source: decayed plant matter.



Well, it feels good to do this again after so long; I only hope this thread lives on to interest and educate more folks out there.[/COLOR][/SIZE][/FONT]

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