Jump to content
OtakuBoards

Writing Recommended Reading [E]


Aaryanna
 Share

Recommended Posts

[COLOR="goldenrod"][FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Just as the title says, I'd like to know what people would recommend as far as reading goes. I'm looking for specific titles that you've enjoyed. Basically I'd like to expand what I read a bit, but sometimes it's hard to know what to pick up. I've tried finding things but it doesn't always work out.

If it helps I'm very much into Science Fiction and Fantasy, I'm a big fan of Mercedes Lackey, Timothy Zahn, Terry Brooks, David Eddings and Christopher Stasheff. But I'm sure there's more authors or rather books out there that I have yet to find.

Also, since I'm sure these two would get mentioned, I have read most of the Harry Potter Series and attempted to read Tolkien's works. I enjoyed Potter, but Tolkien? >_< That I did not. So I realize people adore Tolkien, but I'm not looking for a recommendation of his works, I've already tried reading his stuff.

Anyway, I'd love to hear what you guys think is good to read and why, as well as a tiny bit of what the book is about. Especially since I'd love to have the chance to pick some of them up at the Library when I go on Monday. :catgirl:[/FONT][/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[COLOR="DarkOrange"]Go read [B]Boogiepop and Others[/B]. The book has imspired my life wholly, and is easily my favorite book and the one that has had the largest effect on me.

The story is told from the perspective of five teens who go to the same high school in Tokyo. Each of them plays their own role in the mystery of Boogiepop and a string of disappearances occuring lately.

This story is unbelievably well-told. It is emotional as well as adressing societary issues and ultimately hits really hard. The story is very surrealistic. From the existence of Boogiepop and the Manticore to the alien messenger hiding inside the school, everything has a sense of something that doesn't belong but blends right into the story. Not once for a second did I think, well there's tha alien character, and there's the monster, and there's the superhero - they were all realistic characters who just happened to be a part of this grander scheme.

I feel a definite connection with the author when I read this book. I know what it feels like, and I see what he means.

The best part, though, is that the messages are never forced on you. The book tells a story first and sends a message second. Really, it's not as if it were written to send a message at all - it just says that that's how the world is and it honest about it.

I'm sorry - even when I say it I realize that much of that made very little sense XD Either way, this book is a definite 'buy now'. I encourage multiple readings, since more and more become clear every time you read it. Personally, I'm the type who very rarely rereads or we-watched something because I usually get it all the first time around, but I've read the book I think 5 times, and the 2-volume manga based on the book at least 3. (The book is better than the manga for a lot of reasons, so I only reccommend the manga for the sake of fanboyism.)

And then, of course, after you've read the book, you should go watch the anime sequel [B]Boogiepop Phantom[/B], then go read the second and third book and avidly await the fourth book to be translated :D[/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you like high fantasy... what about urban fantasy? Here are some recs, in no particular order (some young adult, some adult, just a couple of urban fantasies):

[url=http://www.amazon.com/Amulet-Samarkand-Bartimaeus-Trilogy-Book/dp/0786852550/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888595&sr=1-2][u]The Amulet of Samarkand[/u][/url] by Jonathan Stroud [size=1](see also: The Golem's Eye, Ptolemy's Gate)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Twilight-Book-1-Stephenie-Meyer/dp/0316015849/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888487&sr=8-1][u]Twilight[/u][/url] by Stephenie Meyer [size=1](see also: New Moon, Eclipse)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Neverwhere-Novel-Neil-Gaiman/dp/0060557818/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888658&sr=1-1][u]Neverwhere[/u][/url] by Neil Gaiman [size=1](see also: Anansi Boys, Good Omens, American Gods, Coraline, Stardust)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Wicked-Lovely-Melissa-Marr/dp/0061214655/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888560&sr=1-1][u]Wicked Lovely[/u][/url] by Melissa Marr
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Thief-Megan-Whalen-Turner/dp/0060824972/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888794&sr=1-1][u]The Thief[/u][/url] by Megan Whalen Turner [size=1](see also: The Queen of Attolia, The King of Attolia)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Perilous-Gard-Elizabeth-Marie-Pope/dp/0618150730/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888866&sr=1-1][u]The Perilous Gard[/u][/url] by Elizabeth Marie Pope
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Night-Watch-Sergei-Lukyanenko/dp/1401359795/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888927&sr=1-1][u]Night Watch[/u][/url] by Sergei Lukyanenko [size=1](see also: Day Watch, Twilight Watch)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Master-Margarita-Mikhail-Bulgakov/dp/0679760806/ref=pd_bbs_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888974&sr=1-1][u]The Master and Margarita[/u][/url] by Mikhail Bulgakov
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Thirteenth-Tale-Novel-Diane-Setterfield/dp/0743298020/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889003&sr=1-2][u]The Thirteenth Tale[/u][/url] by Diane Setterfield
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Historian-Elizabeth-Kostova/dp/0316154547/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889030&sr=1-1][u]The Historian[/u][/url] by Elizabeth Kostova
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Crown-Originally-Published-Books-Firebird/dp/0142301515/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889116&sr=1-1][u]Crown Duel[/u][/url] by Sherwood Smith
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Tricksters-Choice-Daughter-Lioness-Book/dp/0375814663/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889142&sr=1-2][u]Trickster's Choice[/u][/url] by Tamora Pierce [size=1](see also: Trickster's Queen, the Song of the Lioness series, the Immortals series)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Last-Unicorn-Peter-S-Beagle/dp/0451450523/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889224&sr=1-1][u]The Last Unicorn[/u][/url] by Peter S. Beagle
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Hyperion-Dan-Simmons/dp/0553283685/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889257&sr=1-2][u]Hyperion[/u][/url] by Dan Simmons [size=1](see also: The Fall of Hyperion)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Great-Terrible-Beauty-Readers-Circle/dp/0385732317/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889400&sr=8-2][u]A Great and Terrible Beauty[/u][/url] by Libba Bray [size=1](see also: Rebel Angels)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Tithe-Modern-Faerie-Holly-Black/dp/0689867042/ref=pd_bbs_9/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889400&sr=8-9][u]Tithe[/u][/url] by Holly Black [size=1](see also: Valiant, Ironside, The Spiderwick Chronicles)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/How-Live-Now-Meg-Rosoff/dp/0553376055/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889503&sr=1-1][u]How I Live Now[/u][/url] by Meg Rosoff
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Astonishing-Octavian-Nothing-Traitor-Nation/dp/0763624020/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889578&sr=1-1][u]The Astonishing Life of Octavian Nothing, Traitor to the Nation, Vol. 1: The Pox Party[/u][/url] by M.T. Anderson
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Rebecca-Daphne-Du-Maurier/dp/0380778556/ref=pd_bbs_2/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186890393&sr=8-2][u]Rebecca[/u][/url] by Daphne du Maurier
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Privilege-Sword-Ellen-Kushner/dp/0553586963/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186889699&sr=1-1][u]The Privilege of the Sword[/u][/url] by Ellen Kushner [size=1](see also: Thomas the Rhymer, Swordspoint, The Fall of the Kings)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Deerskin-Robin-McKinley/dp/0441012396/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186890654&sr=1-1][u]Deerskin[/u][/url] by Robin McKinley [size=1](see also: The Hero and the Crown, The Blue Sword)[/size]
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Riddle-Master-Patricia-McKillip/dp/0441005969/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186890709&sr=1-1][u]Riddle-Master[/u][/url] by Patricia A. McKillip
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Twelve-Kingdoms-Hardcover-Sea-Shadow/dp/1598169467/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186891010&sr=8-1][u]The Twelve Kingdoms, Vol. 1: Sea of Shadow[/u][/url] by Fuyumi Ono
[url=http://www.amazon.com/Shadow-Claw-First-Half-Book/dp/0312890176/ref=sr_1_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186891212&sr=1-1][u]Shadow & Claw[/u][/url] by Gene Wolfe [size=1](see also: Sword & Citadel)[/size]

That's off the top of my head and based on what I've read in recent memory (hence leaving out stuff like Jane Yolen's excellent dragon series and a lot of YA I haven't had the time to revisit).

I'd have been happy to provide descriptions for all of them, but... well, that might have taken up too much time & space. :animeswea Since you know your tastes better than I do, please feel free to ask me further questions if anything catches your interest.

One or two items on the list are not fantasy or sci-fi, strictly speaking. However, they still have that kind of feeling to them. I didn't realize Octavian Nothing was historical fiction until I was well past the point of no return. The Thirteenth Tale is like one of those crazy Bronte-esque novels from the 1800s... it may not have spells flying around, but it sure as heck doesn't feel like contemporary reality. Same goes for Rebecca.

~Dagger~
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='Dagger'][url=http://www.amazon.com/Twilight-Book-1-Stephenie-Meyer/dp/0316015849/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/102-4768142-6212910?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1186888487&sr=8-1][u]Twilight[/u][/url] by Stephenie Meyer [size=1](see also: New Moon, Eclipse)[/size][/QUOTE]

[FONT="Arial"]SECONDED. These are my favorite books ever. That may just be because I love vampires, but this series has sort of a different take on them than I've read before. There's also tons of romance and suspense. :]

Another vampire book that I really enjoyed is Peeps by Scott Westerfeld. This time the vampires are created by a parasite, and while the main character has the parasite, he's only a carrier and doesn't feel the adverse effects of it. (Like aversion to sunlight, the need to eat humans, etc.)

And while I'm on the subject of vampires, I would say if you didn't like Tolkien, then you probably won't like Anne Rice. I'm just saying this from what I remember of both authors...I liked the Hobbit, and I liked Interview With a Vampire, but everything after those two original books I just couldn't stay interested in. Anne Rice uses a LOT of description and obscure words...not to mention the extreme sexuality of all her characters. It's quite a bit more adult-oriented than Lord of the Rings, but both series bored me. :/

Okay, non-vampire books...um...

Well...

:[ Drat. I'm having a lot of trouble thinking of some. I guess I could stand to expand my reading interests...(though really anything that isn't about vampires at all kind of bores me a lot. Haha).

Oh, I really really liked A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess. It's not exactly sci-fi or fantasy, but it's set in a word ruled by violent teenagers. Once I got used to all the made up slang, it was a lot of fun to read. There are plenty of dictionaries for the fictional "nadsat" speak, though, just in case it's too confusing.[/FONT]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[COLOR="Green"][FONT="Arial Narrow"]As far as fantasy goes...
The Last of the Renshai: Mickey Zucker Reichert
Really great developed lands, with an interesting premise. I love it mostly because of the philosophical undertones concerning law, chaos, and balance.

The Earthsea Series: Ursula K. LeGuin
Another cool concept as far as fantasy tales go. Also, very short, which is nice.

Chronicles of Narnia: C.S. Lewis
I'm sure you've probably heard of them, but in the case that you haven't read them yet, most definitely recommend.

Life of Pi: Yann Martel
Really great story, and the main character is an absolutely awesome, complex guy.

And also, these authors are pretty good IMO
Gabriel Garcia Marquez
Ray Bradbury
Milan Kundera[/FONT][/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[COLOR="goldenrod"][FONT="Comic Sans MS"][quote name='Dagger']I'd have been happy to provide descriptions for all of them, but... well, that might have taken up too much time & space. :animeswea Since you know your tastes better than I do, please feel free to ask me further questions if anything catches your interest.[/QUOTE]That list with the links is fantastic. :catgirl: Especially since Amazon has descriptions of the books. I can guarantee you that I'll be making a list to take with me to the library tomorrow.

Thanks for all the suggestions everyone. Trust me I'll eventually get to all of them. I tend to read quite a lot so it bugs me when I'm not having good luck finding stuff to read. Heh. Oh and by all means, if there are more suggestions... I'd love to hear them. I mean it when I say I read a lot.

Oh and dMage, even though it's been a while, I have read the Chronicles of Narnia books as well as watched the shows that were made from the books. I kind of had too since Tom Baker, the fourth doctor from Dr. Who played one of the other characters in Narnia in one of the later books. Fun stuff! :catgirl:[/FONT][/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[size=1][color=#8B008B][B]The Tales of the Otori[/B] by Lian Hearn was a good series for me [even though I haven't read the last two books XP]. It's based around a boy named Takeo and a few other characters in the feudal Japan era. If you're looking for suspense, magic realism, and the like- I think you'll like the series.

Then there's [B]The Lovely Bones[/B] by Alice Sebold, which is a book revolved around a young girl and her death and how it affects her family and friends. It's also a book based around magic realism. I found it a wonderful, darling book.

I can't really think of any other ones at the moment, but I'll let you know when I do figure it out.[/size][/color]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='dMage'][COLOR="Green"][FONT="Arial Narrow"]
Chronicles of Narnia: C.S. Lewis
I'm sure you've probably heard of them, but in the case that you haven't read them yet, most definitely recommend.
[/FONT][/COLOR][/QUOTE]

[COLOR="DeepSkyBlue"][SIZE="1"]Love these books. You should definitely read them.

My personal favorite book isn't fantasy-related at all and is hardly even science fiction... but it's still an incredible book, and I think the entire world should read it. [U]1984[/U] by George Orwell was written in 1948 and portrays the future under communist/socialist rule. It's really a fantastic book, and I would recommend at least reading the Amazon summary or something or another... I've never heard of anyone who didn't like this book.

Plus, if you ever have summer reading, I guarantee you this will be on a list.[/SIZE][/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I reread Philip Pullman's trilogy [U]His Dark Materials[/U] and Garth Nix's [U]Sabriel[/U] books this summer and found that I loved them just as much the second time around. I always thought the magic in [U]Sabriel[/U] was especially interesting, and the three books are fairly dark for their age range, so I definitely suggest those.

Sara Douglass is a pretty good fantasy author as well, if you can get past the occasional fit of angst and/or misogyny.

Guy Gavriel Kay is beyond amazing, as well. I've read most of his books, and my favorite is [U]The Sarantine Mosaic[/U]. It's more historical fiction than fantasy, but many of his books do delve into magic and the supernatural. [u]The Fionavar Tapestry[/u] is full of magic and the power of fate, and all of that good stuff. His most recent book [u]Ysabel[/u] had a lot to do with reincarnation, if that's of any interest to you.

There's also a lot to be said for Stephen King, especially if you enjoy dark and scary things.

Narnia is, of course, a must, and I also suggest [U]The Nine Princes In Amber[/U] by Roger Zelazny for more delicious epic fantasy.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[SIZE=1][COLOR=DarkGreen][B][U]Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs[/U] [/B]and also [B][U]Killing Yourself To Live[/U][/B], both by [B]Chuck Klosterman[/B].

Neither one are fantasy or science fiction, but they are both fantastic books. Quite enjoyably critical looks at pop culture, music, love, and life in general. Completely entertaining books from page one to end. I strongly recommend them.[/COLOR][/SIZE]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[QUOTE]I reread Philip Pullman's trilogy His [url]http://www.otakuboards.com/newreply.php?do=newreply&noquote=1&p=788318[/url]
OtakuBoards - Reply to TopicDark Materials and Garth Nix's Sabriel books this summer and found that I loved them just as much the second time around. I always thought the magic in Sabriel was especially interesting, and the three books are fairly dark for their age range, so I definitely suggest those. [/QUOTE]
[COLOR="SlateGray"]
Cool, two of my favourite series. The rest of the Sabriel series was a bit of a let-down, but HDM is good the whole way through. Definite recommended reading.[/COLOR]

[QUOTE]
Narnia is, of course, a must[/QUOTE]
[COLOR="SlateGray"]
Odd you should say that, considering Pullman wrote HDM as a direct rebuttal to Narnia and everything it stood for... frankly I think Narnia is crap. Cliched and unoriginal; black is black, white is white, talking animals... makes me want to hurl.

What would I suggest? Well, I mainly read dystopian cyberpunk/space operas but maybe you'll find something to like in my suggestions:

[b]Illium[/b] by Dan Simmons - A fascinating story, it's told in three narratives in three distinct and entertaining style... it rarely fails to entertain. An awesome take on the Trojan War, aswell as reality itself, it'll make you think. Some fantastic characters, aswell.

[b]Starship Troopers[/b] by Robert A. Heinlein - The seminal work of modern sci-fi, it did for military fiction what Isaac Asimov did for robots. And yet the first thing people think when they hear the title is that stupid movie... Even if it doesn't sound like your thing, look for it. It's not about war as much as it is about characters - and if you don't like it, you can always put it down.

[b]Slaughterhouse-Five[/b] by Kurt Vonnegut - A love-it-or-hate-it book by an author much the same, you'll either be confused by the narrative or love it to death. The story is complex in its simplicity and hilariously absurd, while at the same time profound on so many levels.

A few others that I'd recommend but am too lazy to describe:

[b]Dune[/b] by Frank Herbert
[b]Keys to the Kingdom (Series)[/b] by Garth Nix
[b]The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy[/b] by the incomparable Douglas Adams
[b]Overtime/Grail Blazers[/b] by Tom Holt
[b]Discworld (Series)[/b] by Terry Pratchett
[b]Cat's Cradle[/b] by Kurt Vonnegut
[b]Jitterbug Perfume[/b] by Tom Robbins
[b]Watchmen[/b] by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons (Yes, it's a comic, but it's still LITERATURE dammit! [/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[COLOR="DarkRed"]Now, I would like some reccommended reading if you can give it. I am looking more towards vampire/fantasy stories along that line. Lycans/shapeshifters too!

Let's see, I already read most of the Anita Blake series but stopped when it got too focused on sex. I am in the middle of reading Magic Bites and working on the series that has Interview With a Vampire.

So do you guys know of any good vampire novels that I missed?[/COLOR]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[size=1][color=teal]This post is highly, [i]highly[/i] tailored to those who enjoy sci-fi or rather, as I do, adore sci-fi. So let us begin:

[b]The Hyperion Cantos[/b] [i]by Dan Simmons[/i]: This series is four books, each as brilliant as the last. Individually they are [i]?Hyperion?[/i], [i]?The Fall of Hyperion?[/i], [i]?Endymion?[/i] and [i]?The Rise of Endymion?[/i]. The main plot is split between the two sub-series of books, with Hyperion dealing with the Human Hegemony taking on the Ouster Swarms along with the nefarious machinations of the A.I. TechnoCore and Endymion dealing with the aftermath of the first two novels with the characters on the run from the reinvigorated Catholic Church and its all encompassing Pax.

The Hyperion section is the more sci-fi of the two with the first book more a collection of separate tales about the seven Pilgrims which the book focuses on, the second Hyperion book then focuses more on the Ouster war and its overall consequences. Whereas Endymion has more of a spiritual side too it, especially as the main enemy is the Catholic Church, heh. I would highly recommend these books to serious readers as they are not for the light hearted ?One chapter before bed? reader.

[b]The Horus Heresy Series[/b] [i]by various authors[/i]: Set in the 31st Millennium these books serve as the back story to one of the most monumental events in the fictional universe of Warhammer 40,000. So far there are five books in the series and they are all fantastic to read and a great way to enter the world of Warhammer 40,000. The books, so far, in order are:
[list]
[*][b]Horus Rising[/b] [i]by Dan Abnett[/i].
[*][b]False Gods[/b] [i]by Graham McNeill[/i].
[*][b]Galaxy in Flames[/b] [i]by Ben Counter[/i].
[*][b]Flight of the Eisenstein[/b] [i]by James Swallow[/i].
[*][b]Fulgrim[/b] by [i]Graham McNeill[/i]
[/list]
Now you may think that having different authors for the books makes the series feel disjointed and bumpy but its quite the opposite. While each book still contains the characters you?ve grown to love the approach is always fresh and feels really good to read. I have no shame in saying these are the first books which have made be literally gasp or stop reading simply because I didn?t want anything bad to happen to my favourite characters. Again, highly recommended to sci-fi fans for being brilliant novels and a gateway into the huge galaxy that is Warhammer 40,000.

[b]The Eisenhorn Series[/b] [i]by Dan Abnett[/i]: Another Warhammer 40,000 series, and one which couldn?t be more different from the Horus Heresy series. Instead of focusing on the awe inspiring Space Marines this series lends its focus to the shadowy and mysterious Holy Inquisition of the Emperor. Tasked with burning out the alien, the witch and the heretic from the Imperium of Man the Inquisition is the greyest faction within the universe of Warhammer 40,000. The three books of the series are [i]?Xenos?[/i], [i]?Malleus?[/i] and [i]?Hereticus?[/i] and are named after the three main Ordos of the Inquisition. The main character of this series is the Ordo Xenos Inquisitor Gregor Eisenhorn.

A fantastic piece of work that delves into one of the best parts of the Warhammer 40,000 mythos and is handled expertly by Dan Abnett who has a great flair for this kind of writing, describing in great detail Eisenhorns war against those who threaten the stability of the Imperium.[/color][/size]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='Japan_86'][COLOR="DarkRed"]Now, I would like some reccommended reading if you can give it. I am looking more towards vampire/fantasy stories along that line. Lycans/shapeshifters too!

Let's see, I already read most of the Anita Blake series but stopped when it got too focused on sex. I am in the middle of reading Magic Bites and working on the series that has Interview With a Vampire.

So do you guys know of any good vampire novels that I missed?[/COLOR][/QUOTE]
[FONT="Arial"]
TWILIGHT. :]]]

The first book in that series has vampires, but the next two, New Moon and Eclipse, have vampires AND werewolves. Whee!

[/FONT]
Link to comment
Share on other sites

[quote name='Warmside']
[COLOR="SlateGray"]
Odd you should say that, considering Pullman wrote HDM as a direct rebuttal to Narnia and everything it stood for... frankly I think Narnia is crap. Cliched and unoriginal; black is black, white is white, talking animals... makes me want to hurl.[/COLOR][/QUOTE]

I think Narnia goes a little deeper than that. But that's why I like both Lewis' and Pullman's books, when you get down to it, and why I think both are so very worth reading. What good is a one-sided argument?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...